Something for the weekend

Something for the weekend | SusannahConway.com

 

I’m loving reading through the comments on my last post… I feel a follow-up post coming on ;-)

In the meantime… How to say no without guilt

I’m already plotting a retreat in this treehouse

This plate | this mug | this record player (!!)

“…when you’re innovating, sheer thinking just won’t work. What gets you there is fast iteration, and fast failing. And when you fail, you’ve done something great: you’ve learned something. In hindsight, it might look a little embarrassing, and people will say, “You should’ve known that.” But the truth is you couldn’t have known because it’s unchartered territory. Almost every entrepreneur I know has failed massively many, many times along the way.” Thank you for sharing this interview with me, Elizabeth

Find your flavour of minimalism

Supporting friends doing good things: Tanya’s demystifying the Impostor Complex | Soul Sensuality with Julie | sending good vibes and donations to Tammy’s cousin, Aubrey

A textile butchery (reminds me of this corner shop)

A bespoke typeface for Sir Quentin Blake

On the submerged world

Childless and childfree women role models

Happy weekend, loves! xo

Is blogging dead?

Is blogging dead? No, is the short answer to that, and here's why... | SusannahConway.com

 

No, I don’t think it is, is the short answer to that question. My 10-year blogiversary is fast approaching and I’ve been noticing posts asking whether blogging has had its day. And while it’s true that blogging — as a platform and the way we use it — is evolving, I don’t think it’s about to suddenly disappear. We simply have more options for sharing our words, images and opinions online and where once the blog was the be-all and end-all now it’s just one of many.

When I started back in 2006 my blog was my only home on the internet. These days I’m sharing more consistently on Instagram and Facebook and the community-feel in both places reminds me of the halcyon days of that first year, back when I was doing it as much to connect with others as I was to (re)connect to my self. My online life has always been about creative expression in one form or another and when I launched my first course in January 2009 that creative expression ran parallel with the organic growth of my business. It was definitely “easier” to maintain my blog when I only had one course on offer. Now I have six running throughout the year and I always prioritise my course peeps and our groups over anything else. When I’m in the creative cave making something new I have very few brain cells left over for blog posts, so I truly admire those prolific online mavens who seem to have an endless supply of succinct sentences. Seriously — how do they do it?

I don’t believe in dialling it in, so if I have nothing to say I don’t try to force myself to get something on the blog just because it’s been silent for a few weeks. There’s enough noise online without me adding to the clamour. In theory I do want to be in this space more — I miss it! — but I also really like that my bean-spilling is being saved for my monthly Love Letters. It’s a transition that’s gradually happened over the last year or so, and even though I’m sharing with 20,000+ people each time, it really does feel more intimate. I’m not broadcasting it for general public consumption and I’ve been moved to tears by some of the tender replies I’ve received. In theory I could keep my personal sharing for the Letters and write more generally for the blog, but that’s not really how I write (all my writing is personal sharing, let’s face it ;-) Besides, I’m not a huge fan of the sort of sermonising blog posts that create a distance between the writer and reader. They make sense in a newspaper article or book but feel odd on a blog. I’m old school, I guess — I like my blogging to be personal.

There are hundreds of blog genres, which is why we can’t make any definitive statements about the future of blogging. There are so many different reasons why someone starts a blog in the first place. If I was to start all over again right now, would I set up a blog? Yes, absolutely. If you’re sharing your work with the world I truly believe you need a home on the internet and a static website just isn’t enough. While all those other social media outlets are “easier” to use — sharing a photo on Instagram takes a lot less effort than writing an 800 word blog post — having a blog as part your website gives you the space to express yourself on your terms.

Many of the posts discussing the possible end of blogging are only viewing it through an entrepreneurial lens — blogging as a hobby is not going anywhere. It’s where I started and in many ways it’s where I’d like to return. Creative expression is its own reward — even if I never ran another course I would continue to share online because I love it. Imagery, words, thoughts, inspirations. It’s the stuff that gets me up in the morning, quite frankly. If I hadn’t started a blog when I did my life after bereavement could have taken a very different path. Starting a blog brought me back to myself. It brought me community when I needed it and possibility when I thought I had none. Blogging will change and social media will evolve, but the community at the heart of it will continue to be the most important part for me.

So if you need me, I’ll be hanging out on Instagram and Facebook. I’ll be sharing my heart in my Love Letters. And every so often, when the muse strikes, I’ll be here, too. Blogging is far from dead for this blogger.

* * * * *

Now over to you — if there is anyone still reading my blog I’d love to know if your online reading habits have been changing. Do you still read blogs? Or are you hanging out on other social media platforms more? Maybe a mix of both? And to my fellow bloggers — are you still feeling the urge to blog? If not, what’s changed that for you? x

Something for the weekend

Something for the weekend | SusannahConway.com

 

I’m still alive! *ahem* Moving swiftly on…

Notes from a week in the winter woods

Boom! Excavation uncovers remains of high-status women at Stonehenge

The 58 most commonly misused words and phrases

What the Divine Masculine really looks like

Why the world can’t handle Susan Sarandom and her 69-year-old cleavage

As if Joseph Gordon-Levitt wasn’t cool enough

“Books were my anti-depressant. Then books gave me know-how to get off the floor. Then books gave me ideas. Then ideas gave me actions and actions gave me people and opportunities and a new life.” — this from James Altucher (thanks, Jenny)

Empath vs Empathy: what’s the difference?

Polite responses for people who think tarot, astrology, reiki and other mystical arts are “fake” and “stupid” — Theresa nailed it :-)

A vintage Airstream adventure on the road #thisismyporn

Enjoy the rest of the weekend, loves! xo

Something for the weekend

Something for the weekend | SusannahConway.com

 

Want to create things that matter? Be lazy.

Avocado toast ideas | the mother of all veggie bowls

Gift or a teacher? — loved this from Jenny

A complete (illustrated) guide to bullet journaling

Aleah Chapin’s paintings of older women are STUNNING (this is probably NSFW, just in case you’re reading this in the offfice)

The New York Public Library’s digital collections

How to be kinder to yourself

This T-shirt | this crystal collection

Loving Kyle Cease’s meditation experiment (thank you for introduing me to him, Elizabeth)

David Bowie’s notebooks (*sniff*)

ps. There’s still time to enter the Daily Guidance giveaway! I’ll be closing comments at 11pm (London time) tonight x

 

The Daily Guidance giveaway! Win one of these six decks + a place in class | SusannahConway.com